Handmaid's Tale

At times art seems to imitate life. To some, current events are starting to dance a little too close to some of the classic novels of the past. Such is the case with Hulu’s ‘The Handmaid’s Tale,’ Margaret Atwood’s dystopian novel that takes place in the not-too-distant future.

According to the show’s official synopsis, is the story of life in the dystopia of Gilead, a totalitarian society in what was formerly the United States. Facing environmental disasters and a plunging birthrate, Gilead is ruled by a twisted fundamentalism in its militarized ‘return to traditional values’. As one of the few remaining fertile women, Offred (Elisabeth Moss) is a Handmaid in the Commander’s household, one of the caste of women forced into sexual servitude as a last desperate attempt to repopulate the world. In this terrifying society, Offred must navigate between Commanders, their cruel Wives, domestic Marthas, and her fellow Handmaids – where anyone could be a spy for Gilead – all with one goal: to survive and find the daughter that was taken from her.

Recently stars Yvonne Strahovski and Joseph Fiennes sat down with Deadline, on Earth Day, to talk about some of the parallels and issues that mirror today’s world. Fiennes spoke about the government in particular,

[It’s] amazing, we have an administration here that is happily denying the facts.” Fiennes says, taking note of those scientists who are working to get the truth out there. “Like the Women’s March, we now have scientists across the world, on the streets.

“I think [the series] has come into sharper focus, and certainly women’s rights, autonomy of their bodies, it’s a hot debate here; less, for me in Europe,” he continues. “It’s a no-brainer: women have absolute rights of their own bodies.”

In addition to that, Strahovski continues to delve into the issues of women’s rights, and the parallel of the world where fertile women completely lose any rights to their body is not lost on her.

“The Handmaid’s Tale is a human story, and women’s rights are human rights, and it’s all about equality, but at the end of the day, it’s not equal,” the actress says of the series’ resonance. “You need a feminist movement—you need to label that with something in order to shed light on it, and I feel like there’s no way you can’t acknowledge those parallels, especially in today’s political climate.”

“The Handmaiden’s Tale” stars Jordana Blake, Alexis Bledel, O-T Fagbenle, Joseph Fiennes, Max Minghella, and Elisabeth Moss. It’s 10-episode run begins on April 26th.